Help Us Build the Ultimate Moving-to-Georgia Guide

A lady receiving assistance from a mover as she settles into her new home

Not everyone who drives over Georgia’s state line today will know about the amazing pecans harvested here or that most driving directions in the state’s capital include the word Peachtree. At DSGa we spend a lot of time examining who uses our websites, and this includes brand new residents. Currently, we’re using your feedback to go beyond Google tourist facts. We’re constructing a Moving to Georgia Guide on Georgia.gov that directs new Georgians to the state services they need.

Why is a guide needed?

Moving can be a highly stressful life event for many. If a resident is crossing state lines, there’s a lot more to cover than just planning, purging, packing, and unpacking! In addition to a mountain of boxes, they could be juggling an out-of-state car, buying a new car, have school-age kids, be a veteran, or need rental assistance when they first arrive. For new residents, a guide alleviates the stress of having to know the names of Georgia’s agencies and where to find them. And for agencies, a guide with your services in it creates a great first introduction to your state organization. Residents will remember their first impression when they need to follow up with you for additional services.

What makes the guide different from a list of services?

Now that we’ve compiled the questions new residents often ask agencies, the next step is to organize them intuitively. In our current study, new Georgians can tell us what they’re likely to look for first, second, third and so on, based on where they are in life and why they moved to the Peach State. This will direct how we organize the guide and if users would find a timeline of step-by-step processes useful.

Solving multiple problems with one guide

Moving to Georgia Study

If you know someone who is thinking about moving to Georgia or has recently moved to Georgia we would love to hear from them.

A few years ago, I was one of those new Georgians. And while it was easy to find lots of online articles on sports teams, tourist attractions, or the distance between Atlanta and Savannah, I didn’t know what to expect at the local DMV —I mean the Department of Driver Services

Meanwhile, my friends who moved to a neighboring city had a different moving experience, as they were more focused on school programs that would give their kids a sense of consistency after the move. At DSGa, we never take for granted that state websites cater to different needs, so it’s important to keep in tune with what those needs are every time we build something new.

We’d love to hear from your online visitors

If you’re looking for a way to make your online visitors feel heard, consider sharing our new Georgia Guide study with your newsletter or social media followers. It will take them less than 5 minutes to participate, but the benefits to the guide will be enormous. If you’d like a quick, easy content idea, might we suggest something similar to the text below:

Did you just move to Georgia or know someone who is moving to the Peach State? You can help the state of Georgia build the ultimate moving to Georgia guide by taking this quick survey by August 6th.
 

An invitation to peek into the future

All of DSGa’s civic technology is based on information from you and from your website’s users. Ultimately, the better information we get from your users, the better we can create solutions to help your agency serve them with ease. This is how we stay on the forefront of what users want and on the leading edge in how to deliver it. If you would like to be a part of the future, we could use your help in recruiting your website visitors for studies from time to time. It’s easy. This is our invitation to you to become an Orchard Advocate. 

What does an Orchard Advocate do?

Orchard Advocates

If you work in state government or civic tech this is your chance to help recruit Orchard Growers for studies.

First, we must note that an Orchard Advocate is not the same as an Orchard Grower. An Advocate is someone who works on one of Georgia’s government agencies. A Grower is someone who does not work at an agency but does use government websites. Go here for our guide on Orchard Growers

For Orchard Advocates, any time we have a study that could benefit from the thoughts of your website’s users, we’ll send you a study link to share. If you’re ever wondering what to post on social media or how to fill in an extra newsletter paragraph, these would be excellent places to share a recent study we’ve sent our Advocates. We’ll even throw in some suggested text to make it that much easier. 

Is that all?

Once you’ve shared a study, just respond to our email so we know the study is out there among your users. Just for helping us out we’ll send you some swag, and if you’re interested we can send you a short summary of the study results too.

Lasting First Impression

Ultimately, the Georgia.gov Moving to Georgia Guide is all about making our state services easily accessible to newcomers. Plus it has the nice bonus effect of creating a great first impression for your agency, and forging a solid relationship with your users for years to come. 

 

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